The display I mentioned yesterday. I’m open for title suggestions. #HispanicHeritageMonth

The display I mentioned yesterday. I’m open for title suggestions. #HispanicHeritageMonth

Enchantment? Enchantment!

Enchantment? Enchantment!

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Variety’s Power of Women: New York Impact List.

Variety Magazine reveal its list of powerful New York-based women in Media. A total of 10 Black women made the list including Iman who honored for Humanitarian work in Somalia.

2.Misty Copeland: The first African-American soloist for The American Ballet Theater in two decades. She’s a spokesperson for Project Plie, a “Comprehensive initiative to increase racial and ethnic representation in ballet and diversify America’s ballet companies.”

3. Beverly Bond:  Founder and executive director, Black Girls Rock! Bond is the mastermind behind projects like Black Girls Rock and “Imagine Future” a documentary which debuted at Tribeca Festival. She recently signed a five-year development deal with BET Networks.

4.Lisa E. Davis: Partner, Entertainment Group, Frankfurt Kurnit Klein+Selz. She’s an entertainment lawyer with clients ranging from business in film,television, publishing, music, theater and sports.Her clients include Spike Lee Terry McMillan and many more.

5.Wendy Williams: Host, Best Selling Author and CEO of Wendy Williams Prods, which produce “Celebrities Undercover” for Oxygen.

6.Debra Lee:ChairCEO, BET Networks. With breakout shows like “Real Husbands of Hollywood” and “Being Mary Jane,” BET’s original slate is stronger than ever. “As a testament to our quality programming, we received 19 NAACP Image Award nominations, more than any other network,” Lee says.

7.Kimberley D. Harris: Executive VP, general counsel NBCUniversal. Before joined NBCU in 2013 Harris worked in private practice, government eventually taking a post in the White House Counsel’s Office. At NBCU Harris reports directly to Steve Burke, CEO of NBCUniversal. 

8. Robin Roberts:  Anchor, “Good Morning America.” Roberts became news almost as often as she reported on it in the past year, first returning from a show hiatus during which she received cancer treatment then, while acknowledging everyone who had helped her, outing herself as a lesbian.

9.Audra McDonald: Actor McDonald already has a record five Tony Awards, but she might need to make room on her mantel for another as she is currently starring as Billie Holiday in “Lady Day.” 

10.Sylvia Rhone: President, Epic Records. Rhone stepped down as president of Universal Motown in 2011 to create her own startup imprint, Vested in Culture, it seemed only a matter of time before longtime label maven Rhone would be back at the helm of a major record company. 

(via blackwomenworldhistory)

Falling for the book. #roxanegay #fallforthebook

madamethursday:

invisibleblackunicorn:

thisisnotjapan:

tierracita:

Can everyone please start proactively telling their white girl friends not to do dia de los muertos facepaint for halloween, especially white folks telling other white folks. I know it’s early september but…

nubianbrothaz:

stereoculturesociety:

Culture - The *BLACK* Project - Singers/Musicians

  1. Prince
  2. Sade
  3. Lenny Kravitz

NubianBrothaz.tumblr.com/archive

Yaaaaaassss!

(via thewanderlustlibrarian)

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

@pairee

Boo, don’t leave me.

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

@pairee

Boo, don’t leave me.

illustratedlibrary:

Book cart

:-)

illustratedlibrary:

Book cart

:-)

Dear Library,

Dear Library,

"

I know that Black creativity has saved your life many times before. I know, because I’ve seen it happen. I’ve listened as non-Black people in my communities raised on Hip Hop talked about how it was the only relatable, empowering culture they found that also educated and radicalized them as a youth. It was formational. I’ve watched people become politicized, shaping their new political identities after bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Assata Shakur, Angela Davis and Frantz Fanon. I’ve watched as folks become activist celebrities using radical ideas from Black Power and Civil Rights movements to shape programs that do not benefit Black people. I’ve watched as people make livings and loads of social capital off of DJing Black music, dancing, walking and dressing like Black people, selling the Black aesthetic to others. I’ve heard that friends use Nina Simone and Sade to sing them back from depression, Rihanna and D’Angelo to get them in the mood. So many people in my communities, lately, have been using Octavia Butler to renew their hope for radical futures. Without Black people, what would your lives be? You might be thinking, you know, it’s so much more complicated than all this, race is complex, we’re all part of the human family, etc., etc…

Black art is not free for all damaged souls. When Nina sang about strange fruit, she was talking about a lynching…of Black people. When Black rappers say Fuck the Police, they speak to a state system of lynching…Black people. Your pain and isolation, however real it may be, is not the same as being Black. Your self-adoption into hip hop and djembe drumming and spoken word, makes our art forms all about you. You, however well meaning, have stolen Black labour and invention and used it for your own purpose. It warps the medium and changes the message, the magic, the healing. From now on, consider how the cost of consuming, appropriating, regurgitating, and getting your life in multiple ways from Black art, Black culture, and Black peoples’ creative genius detrimentally impacts our lives. Being Black in an anti-black world means experiencing daily attacks that threaten our dignity, our happiness, our freedom, and often our lives; and in order to enjoy Black culture, you’re going to have to take action to help get these back.

But because Black people’s labour, language, intelligence, creativity, and survival arts have always been considered free for the taking, you probably didn’t feel ways about using it. You probably didn’t think twice. Black culture is the most pilfered, the most ‘borrowed,’ the most thieved culture, and we’ve seen this happen time and tie again.

"

Nadijah Robinson

Quote is from her essay Black Art Is Not A Free For All on Black Girl Dangerous. Read it all. Truly exquisite writing, especially as non-Black people continue to use, consume, pilfer, plagiarize and be appropriative of Black cultural production and art while simultaneously suggesting that Black culture, especially that Black American culture, does not exist. 

I’ve also watched non-Black people suggest Black people contribute “nothing” to anti-oppression theory or praxis while their ENTIRE FRAMEWORK for approaching it is via Black cultural production or Black women’s epistemology.

Like…the cognitive dissonance proffered via perspectives shaped by anti-Blackness is astounding.

(via gradientlair)

hit reblog before i even read it

(via queerfabulousmermaid)

(via poc-creators)